North Dakota Council on the Arts

The North Dakota Council on the Arts (NDCA) is a service and program agency of the state, established in 1967 by State Legislature to develop, promote and support the arts in North Dakota. The NDCA operates with an approximate annual budget of $1.5 million through the support of the National Endowment for the Arts and an appropriation from the North Dakota State Legislature. Over 75 percent of the NDCA budget is awarded to organizations and individuals through various grant programs.

Mission

It is the mission of the North Dakota Council on the Arts to promote, preserve and perpetuate the arts in North Dakota.

Vision

The North Dakota Council on the Arts envisions North Dakota as a state in which:

  • Artists are valued as members of their communities and encouraged in their creative expression
  • The arts are recognized as an essential educational tool – a tool that assists youth in reaching their full potential through creative thinking and problem solving.
  • Artistic quality is recognized and promoted in every performance and presentation.
  • Cultural diversity is promoted and valued for its role as culturally diverse community members add richness and excitement to the lives of all citizens.
  • A network has developed through which citizens from all walks of life are made aware of the availability of art opportunities and benefits.
  • The arts are recognized as a valuable partner in building the state’s economy and enhancing daily life by other state agencies, businesses, organizations, and the general public.

Goals

  • Increase access and engagement in the arts.
  • Broaden and deepen the artists and arts leaders’ role in building and strengthening community partnerships.
  • Create greater sustainability for artists, arts organizations, and the arts in North Dakota.

The connection between art and health is a fast-growing, fairly recent area of emphasis and research that is spreading across the United States.  By contrast, the North Dakota Council on the Arts (NDCA) has worked in this area for some time.  Through the NDCA’s Art for Life Program, our state was one of the first to explore and develop an arts/health nexus in a sustained and systemic way, specifically with regard to people in elder care facilities.

Over a two-year period, 1999-2000, the NDCA placed folk artists to perform in nearly every elder care facility in the state. Powerful anecdotal stories surfaced about the impact of those presentations on the elders. For example, an Alzheimer’s patient, who was often unresponsive and averse to being touched, danced with her husband during a concert.  Another woman, almost completely immobile and confined to a wheelchair, was observed tapping her finger to the beat of the music.  Additional positive anecdotal information was generated in 1999 from the public demonstration requirement of a $2,000 NDCA Folk and Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Grant to Lila Hauge-Stoffel and Mary Seim. That public demonstration was held at the elder care facility where Mary worked. Lila (a professor of art and traditional textile artist), Mary Seim (an activities coordinator and traditional artist), and Troyd Geist (the folklorist with the NDCA) recognized these powerful examples. However, they also wondered if the arts’ impact with regard to health could be quantifiably measured.

Dr. William Thomas, a physician in New York, conducted medical research with elders in long term care facilities.  That research resulted in the identification of the “Three Plagues” (loneliness, boredom, and helplessness) that, in a very real measurable way, negatively affects the physical and emotional health of our elders. In response, he developed an approach to institutional care called the Eden Alternative that is used throughout the country as a therapeutic model to counter the negative effects of loneliness, boredom, and helplessness. Building on that study, the NDCA wanted to know if extensive, long-term arts and artist interactions would influence the Three Plagues, and, thus by extension, improve the emotional and physical health of our elders.

So, in 2001-03, the NDCA (with Troyd Geist, Lila Hauge-Stoffel, Mary Seim, and Pioneer House, an elder care facility in Fargo) conducted a $57,000 therapeutic arts pilot study with support from the National Endowment for the Arts.  Assessment tools were designed to quantifiably measure the effects of extensive folk, fine arts, and artist interactions with regard to the sense of loneliness, boredom, and helplessness experienced by the elders.  Over that two-year period quilters, storytellers, Swedish Dala painters, potters, watercolor artists, and more, worked with the elders. The final assessment of the study pointed to a marked improvement in all three areas. The results of this study are discussed in the NDCA’s publication Art for Life: The Therapeutic Power and Promise of the Arts. 

The subsequent quantifiable and anecdotal information was then utilized by the NDCA to obtain funding from the North Dakota state legislature to expand the pilot project into a program to improve the lives of elders by addressing the Three Plagues with art.  In the program, the NDCA supports local arts agencies who partner with local artists and local elder care facilities to conduct arts residencies and activities with the facilities’ residents and their families.  The program began in 2008 in three communities; Jamestown, Langdon, and Pekin (working alternately with McVille and Lakota). By 2014, the Art for Life Program will involve 9 local arts agencies working with approximately 14 elder care facilities in 11 communities:  Ellendale, Enderlin, Grand Forks, Jamestown, Langdon, New Rockford, New Town, Pekin (with McVille and Lakota), and Wahpeton.

In 2013, recognized as a national leader in this effort of combining the areas of arts, health, and aging, the NDCA was asked to participate in a national “best practices” effort involving 13 states. This “Communities of Practice” project is supported in partnership between the National Center for Creative Aging and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Additional articles about the impact of the Art for Life Program will appear in future newsletters and press releases; stories about elders becoming more responsive, interacting with others, and better able to make decisions, stories about a woman on her deathbed sharing a moment through a storytelling project, a lonely elderly man with children to finally call his own through a theater activity, a community that comes together to honor U.S. military veterans through a quilting project, a woman suffering from cancer and depression coming out of her shell – all these and more through the Art for Life Program.

NDCA has created a Sundogs and Sunflowers: An Art for Life Program Guide for Creative Aging, Health, and Wellness tool kit that will be available around July of 2017.

NDCA’s Art for Life Program at http://www.nd.gov/arts/programs/art-for-life. 

Population estimates, July 1, 2016, (V2016)  757,952
Population estimates, July 1, 2015, (V2015)  756,927
Population estimates base, April 1, 2010, (V2016)  672,591
Population estimates base, April 1, 2010, (V2015)  672,591
Population, percent change – April 1, 2010 (estimates base) to July 1, 2016, (V2016)  12.7%
Population, percent change – April 1, 2010 (estimates base) to July 1, 2015, (V2015)  12.5%
Population, Census, April 1, 2010  672,591
Age and Sex
Persons under 5 years, percent, July 1, 2015, (V2015)  7.0%
Persons under 5 years, percent, April 1, 2010  6.6%
Persons under 18 years, percent, July 1, 2015, (V2015)  23.0%
Persons under 18 years, percent, April 1, 2010  22.3%
Persons 65 years and over, percent, July 1, 2015, (V2015)  14.2%
Persons 65 years and over, percent, April 1, 2010  14.5%
Female persons, percent, July 1, 2015, (V2015)  48.6%
Female persons, percent, April 1, 2010  49.5%
Race and Hispanic Origin
White alone, percent, July 1, 2015, (V2015) 88.6%
White alone, percent, April 1, 2010  90.0%
Black or African American alone, percent, July 1, 2015, (V2015)  2.4%
Black or African American alone, percent, April 1, 2010  1.2%
American Indian and Alaska Native alone, percent, July 1, 2015, (V2015) 5.5%
American Indian and Alaska Native alone, percent, April 1, 2010 5.4%
Asian alone, percent, July 1, 2015, (V2015) 1.4%
Asian alone, percent, April 1, 2010  1.0%
Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone, percent, July 1, 2015, (V2015) 0.1%
Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone, percent, April 1, 2010
Two or More Races, percent, July 1, 2015, (V2015) 2.1%
Two or More Races, percent, April 1, 2010 1.8%
Hispanic or Latino, percent, July 1, 2015, (V2015) 3.5%
Hispanic or Latino, percent, April 1, 2010 2.0%
White alone, not Hispanic or Latino, percent, July 1, 2015, (V2015) 85.8%
White alone, not Hispanic or Latino, percent, April 1, 2010 88.9%
Population Characteristics
Veterans, 2011-2015  51,179
Foreign born persons, percent, 2011-2015  3.2%
Housing
Housing units, July 1, 2015, (V2015)  362,960
Housing units, April 1, 2010  317,498
Owner-occupied housing unit rate, 2011-2015  64.1%
Median value of owner-occupied housing units, 2011-2015  $153,800
Median selected monthly owner costs -with a mortgage, 2011-2015  $1,243
Median selected monthly owner costs -without a mortgage, 2011-2015  $423
Median gross rent, 2011-2015  $709
Building permits, 2015  6,256
Families and Living Arrangements
Households, 2011-2015  299,638
Persons per household, 2011-2015  2.32
Living in same house 1 year ago, percent of persons age 1 year+, 2011-2015  82.2%
Language other than English spoken at home, percent of persons age 5 years+, 2011-2015  5.6%
Education
High school graduate or higher, percent of persons age 25 years+, 2011-2015  91.7%
Bachelor’s degree or higher, percent of persons age 25 years+, 2011-2015  27.7%
Health
With a disability, under age 65 years, percent, 2011-2015  6.8%
Persons without health insurance, under age 65 years, percent  8.9%
Economy
In civilian labor force, total, percent of population age 16 years+, 2011-2015  69.3%
In civilian labor force, female, percent of population age 16 years+, 2011-2015  65.0%
Total accommodation and food services sales, 2012 ($1,000)  2,045,123
Total health care and social assistance receipts/revenue, 2012 ($1,000) 5,418,355
Total manufacturers shipments, 2012 ($1,000)  14,427,360
Total merchant wholesaler sales, 2012 ($1,000)  28,150,837
Total retail sales, 2012 ($1,000)  15,519,816
Total retail sales per capita, 2012  $22,183
Transportation
 Mean travel time to work (minutes), workers age 16 years+, 2011-2015  17.2
Income and Poverty
Median household income (in 2015 dollars), 2011-2015  $57,181
Per capita income in past 12 months (in 2015 dollars), 2011-2015  $32,035
Persons in poverty, percent  11.0%
Businesses
Total employer establishments, 2014  24,698
Total employment, 2014  360,970
Total annual payroll, 2014 ($1,000)  17,362,523
Total employment, percent change, 2013-2014  5.3%
Total nonemployer establishments, 2014  53,588
All firms, 2012  68,270
Men-owned firms, 2012  37,016
Women-owned firms, 2012  20,316
Minority-owned firms, 2012  3,190
Nonminority-owned firms, 2012  62,271
Veteran-owned firms, 2012  6,584
Nonveteran-owned firms, 2012  56,904
Geography
Population per square mile, 2010  9.7
Land area in square miles, 2010  69,000.80
FIPS Code  38
~ https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/table/PST045215/38

Nelson County Arts Council video of their participation in NDCA’s Art for Life Program

Art for Life project with Nelson County Arts Council. Elders and students in 7th grade shared, compared experiences and folklore from school experiences with the Sun Dogs book as the catalyst.  An old school desk was found. The kids painted the desk, then the elders built upon the artwork by painting, collecting collage materials representing their era in school, and modge podged the desk. To view the video from Nelson County Arts Council in Aneta, ND, visit https://www.facebook.com/ncacpekin/videos.

Creative Aging Point Person

Amy Schmidt

Public Information Officer and Accessibility Coordinator. Programs Managed: Community Arts Access, Professional Development, Newsletters and Website.